Summary of The Emmaus Code
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Summary of The Emmaus Code

Finding Jesus in the Old Testament by David Limbaugh




Publication Date:

Number of pages: 88

ISBN-10: 1539124231

ISBN-13: 9781539124238

Warning: This is an independent addition to The Emmaus Code, meant to enhance your experience of the original book. If you have not yet bought the original copy, make sure to purchase it before buying this unofficial summary from aBookaDay. INTRODUCTION David Limbaugh begins his introduction with the story of the trial of the Apostle Paul, a former Jew and ardent persecutor of Christians, who converted to Christianity. After his conversion, Paul ministered to Gentiles but also had an enduring love for Jews, and therefore decides to visit Jerusalem at the end of his third missionary journey, where he is accused of blasphemy and defiling the Jewish Temple by bringing Gentiles into it. Beaten, arrested by Roman authorities, and standing on trial before Governor Felix in Caesarea, Paul gives a speech that proclaims his faith in Christ and also declares common ground with the Jews. Paul goes on to affirm his belief in the Old Testament Scripture of the Jews and insists that according to “the Way” (Christianity), he still worships the God of the Jewish fathers, and is indeed preaching the truth of “the Law” and the Prophets (whom his accusers accept)— that there will be a resurrection from the dead of both the just and unjust. Two years later, in prison, an investigation gives Paul the opportunity to again stress his innocence by decidedly affirming the Jewish religion, saying “nothing but what the prophets and Moses said would come to pass…that the Christ must suffer and that by being the first to rise from the dead, he would proclaim light both to our people and to the Gentiles” (Acts 26:22). Paul is sent to a prison in Rome where he continues to evangelize visitors, writes his Prison Epistles (Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon, and Philippians), and according to Christian tradition, died as a martyr. It is the goal of the author with this book, as he explains after the story of Paul, to demonstrate that with the benefit of later revelations, we can see truths in Scriptures that weren’t evident to people in Old Testament times. The author explains how he had first studied the Bible and struggled with understanding the big picture, especially the Old Testament. Over time he took a more systematic approach to studying it, and became more comfortable with the material. He soon desired to share what he had learned and attempted to publish a primer, but failed. After his work on the Christian apologetical book, Jesus on Trial, which he found to be the most satisfying of his career, the author became excited to work on one that would help others to understand how “just as the Old Testament is foundational to the New, our basic understanding of the Old Testament is crucial to our comprehension of how Christ dominates its pages.” The Emmaus Code is that book, and the author believes that “decoding the Emmaus road”— the hidden dialogue of the resurrected Christ with the two men on the road to Emmaus, is the key to understanding the entirety of Scripture. Limbaugh describes the format of The Emmaus Code and how it is written for the layperson— that he begins with a historical summary that outlines “the flow” of the Old Testament. Next, he outlines prophecy, typology, and covenants, among other evidence, that point to Jesus Christ of the New Testament. He emphasizes recurring themes that are consistent across different contexts and settings; particularly those that focus upon the people of Israel, who repeatedly disobey and sin against God, but to whom God consistently bestows blessings upon when they are obedient and faithful. The author stresses that The Emmaus Code is a primer, which like a study guide, can enhance biblical understanding; and hopes that his enthusiasm for the Bible is contagious. Available on PC, Mac, smart phone, tablet or Kindle device. © 2015 All Rights Reserved

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